How taking the census creates job stability for those who need it most

Did you know filling out the census can help organizations like the Community Progress Council offer more employment programs? For each person who isn’t counted in the 2020 Census, neighborhoods could miss out on funding for critical public services like these.

Even before the pandemic hit the region, many people in York County struggled to make ends meet.  

Some work full-time jobs but don’t earn enough. Others seeking employment face language barriers or lack the necessary education, skills, or training. Many can’t find reliable childcare or transportation.  

That’s when Community Progress Council steps in to help. The downtown-based agency works with low- to moderate-income families and helps them become self-sufficient.  

“We may assist someone with obtaining employment, but that doesn’t always mean the work is done,” says Tannisha Fuentes, Director of Workforce Development. 

While CPC’s Workforce Development services help with resume, writing, conduction mock interviews, and completing job applications, the main focus is on skill development, training, educational, and career opportunities that lead to livable wages. 

A portion of the CPC’s funding is determined by York County’s population count, which is why taking the 2020 Census is so important. 

(Click here to take it online now.)

“Increase in funding would give us flexibility to provide a holistic approach to support families to get over the hump to reach self-sufficiency,” Tannisha says.  

She points to York’s Latino and Black populations – ones who are often undercounted in the census – as those who need the most employment support. 

“Our Black and Brown brothers and sisters face the highest unemployment rate,” she says, citing a study published this year by the York County Economic Alliance. That study also reports that only 12% of Hispanic or Latino workers make a living wage in York County. 

“I feel a sense of urgency that we stand up and let it be known that we’re here,” Tannisha says. “We must do our best to advocate for funding that impacts York in a meaningful way.” 

Click here to take the census now

How taking the census creates job stability for those who need it most

Did you know filling out the census can help organizations like the Community Progress Council offer more employment programs? For each person who isn’t counted in the 2020 Census, neighborhoods could miss out on funding for critical public services like these.

Even before the pandemic hit the region, many people in York County struggled to make ends meet.  

Some work full-time jobs but don’t earn enough. Others seeking employment face language barriers or lack the necessary education, skills, or training. Many can’t find reliable childcare or transportation.  

That’s when Community Progress Council steps in to help. The downtown-based agency works with low- to moderate-income families and helps them become self-sufficient.  

“We may assist someone with obtaining employment, but that doesn’t always mean the work is done,” says Tannisha Fuentes, Director of Workforce Development. 

While CPC’s Workforce Development services help with resume, writing, conduction mock interviews, and completing job applications, the main focus is on skill development, training, educational, and career opportunities that lead to livable wages. 

A portion of the CPC’s funding is determined by York County’s population count, which is why taking the 2020 Census is so important. 

(Click here to take it online now.)

“Increase in funding would give us flexibility to provide a holistic approach to support families to get over the hump to reach self-sufficiency,” Tannisha says.  

She points to York’s Latino and Black populations – ones who are often undercounted in the census – as those who need the most employment support. 

“Our Black and Brown brothers and sisters face the highest unemployment rate,” she says, citing a study published this year by the York County Economic Alliance. That study also reports that only 12% of Hispanic or Latino workers make a living wage in York County. 

“I feel a sense of urgency that we stand up and let it be known that we’re here,” Tannisha says. “We must do our best to advocate for funding that impacts York in a meaningful way.” 

Click here to take the census now

I feel a sense of urgency that we stand up and let it be known that we’re here.

Tannisha Fuentes, Director of Workforce Development Community Progress Council

Take the census online now

I feel a sense of urgency that we stand up and let it be known that we’re here.

Tannisha Fuentes, Director of Workforce Development Community Progress Council

Take the census online now

Help York build a stronger future for you and your neighbors

Take the Census now