Chase Landes, Kinsley Construction (Photo by Caleb Robertson/Our York Media)

Motorcycle crash doesn’t end career of Kinsley Construction apprentice

While he was recovering, the company kept Chase Landes in the apprentice program, which kept him on the company’s insurance that helped pay for his hospital bills, physical therapy and, eventually, a high-tech prosthetic leg.

Story paid for by: Kinsley Construction
Written by: Anthony Machcinski
Chase Landes, Kinsley Construction (Photo by Caleb Robertson/Our York Media)

Chase Landes’ passion for construction began as a child.

“I was always hands on,” Chase says. “I just had an interest in building things with KNEX and LEGOs.”

He signed up for Kinsley Construction’s apprentice program straight out of West York High School in 2016 and excelled, but a year after signing up, his construction career nearly collapsed.

***

Chase loved motorcycles as much as he liked building things. He rode dirt bikes all his life. After he got a job with Kinsley, he was finally able to afford his first street bike: a Suzuki GSX-R600.

In June 2017, during a ride up to Shippensburg with a group of friends, Chase’s bike slipped going into a turn. The momentum carried him into a telephone pole.

I remember waking up and not knowing where I was. I didn’t really feel anything. I didn’t know what was going on.

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Chase Landes Kinsley Construction apprentice

“I remember waking up and not knowing where I was,” he says. “I didn’t really feel anything. I didn’t know what was going on.”

The crash shattered his right femur. Doctors rushed him into surgery but couldn’t save his leg. Without amputation, his injuries could have killed him.

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While he was recovering, Kinsley didn’t forget about Chase.

He remained enrolled in the apprentice program, which kept him on the company’s insurance that helped pay for his hospital bills, physical therapy and, eventually, a high-tech prosthetic leg.

From the first days of the crash, members of his Kinsley family were by his side visiting him in the hospital.

When he came back to work on January 2, they were there catching him up on work and offering a helping hand.

Today, he moves more cautiously around the construction site, but when it comes to the everyday actions – like climbing a ladder – he has no restrictions.

“It’s an investment in me as a person,” Chase says. “It showed me that this group of people cares about putting me first.”

Story paid for by Kinsley Construction

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